Pain Abdomen

Pain Abdomen

Abdominal Pain?

Abdominal pain (or stomach ache) is a common symptom associated with transient disorders or serious disease. Diagnosing the cause of abdominal pain can be difficult, because many diseases can cause this symptom. Most frequently the cause is benign and/or self-limiting, but more serious causes may require urgent intervention.

Acute abdominal pain

Acute abdomen can be defined as severe, persistent abdominal pain of sudden onset that is likely to require surgical intervention to treat its cause. The pain may frequently be associated with nausea and vomiting, abdominal distention, fever and signs of shock. One of the most common conditions associated with acute abdominal pain is acute appendicitis.

Selected causes of acute abdomen?

Selected causes of acute abdomen
Traumatic : blunt or perforating trauma to the stomach, bowel, spleen, liver, or kidney
Inflammatory : Infections such as appendicitis, cholecystitis, pancreatitis, pyelonephritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, hepatitis, mesenteric adenitis, or a subdiaphragmatic abscess Perforation of a peptic ulcer, a diverticulum, or the caecum Complications of inflammatory bowel disease such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis
Mechanical : Small bowel obstruction secondary to adhesions caused by previous surgeries, intussusception, hernias, benign or malignant neoplasms Large bowel obstruction caused by colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, volvulus, fecal impaction or hernia
Vascular : occlusive intestinal ischemia, usually caused by thromboembolism of the superior mesenteric artery

Chronic abdominal pain?

Chronic functional abdominal pain (CFAP) is the ongoing presence of abdominal pain for which there is no known medical explanation. CFAP is characterized by chronic pain, with no physical explanation or findings (no structural, infectious, or mechanical causes can be found).

Chronic and recurrent abdominal pain is common in children and the term refers to pain for which a specific cause (by history, physical examination, or laboratory tests) has not been determined. It occurs in 9 to 15 percent of all children. In boys, pain is most common between ages five and six years. Girls have pain most commonly between five and six years and 9 and 10 years.
Chronic and recurrent abdominal pain is common in children and the term refers to pain for which a specific cause (by history, physical examination, or laboratory tests) has not been determined. It occurs in 9 to 15 percent of all children. In boys, pain is most common between ages five and six years. Girls have pain most commonly between five and six years and 9 and 10 years.

Chronic Abdominal Pain Causes?

Organic Disorders — Organic disorders include conditions caused by an identifiable problem in the body. Constipation is one of the most common causes of recurrent pain.
Functional Disorders — Functional disorders do not have an identifiable cause. Examples include functional dyspepsia (stomach upset), Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), abdominal migraine and functional abdominal pain. The symptoms can be so severe that the child may have frequent absences from school and be unable to participate in activities.
Functional Dyspepsia — Dyspepsia is pain or discomfort in the upper belly. Discomfort may include feelings of stomach fullness, becoming full after eating a small amount of food, bloating, nausea, retching, or vomiting.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome — Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) causes symptoms including chronic abdominal pain and a change in bowel habits (diarrhea or constipation or both). (See “Patient information: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (Beyond the Basics)”.)
Abdominal Migraine — Abdominal migraines cause episodes of intense abdominal pain, centered in the mid-abdomen, lasting one hour or more. The child might also have nausea, vomiting, headache, or sensitivity to light. Many, but not all, children with abdominal migraine have a family history of migraine. (See “Patient information: Headache in children (Beyond the Basics)”.)
Functional Abdominal Pain — Some children have symptoms that do not fit the definition of organic disorders, functional dyspepsia, IBS, or abdominal migraine. In this case, the child might be described as having functional abdominal pain.